A New Windrush DVD - purchase it now
For more information about Harvest for Life, please go to the NTCG page on this site.
Songs of Praise -  Harvest Temple
For more information about Black History you can view the following sites:

www.blackhistorymonth.org.uk
officialblackhistorymonthuk.co.uk/ 
www.blackpast.org
www.timeforkids.com/minisite/black-history-month
www.fun.familyeducation.com
www.factmonster.com/black-history-month

www.teachingdrums.com/BHM%20Workshops.htm 

http://history1900s.about.com/od/people/tp/famousafricanamericans.htm
www.biography.com/people/groups/famous-black-inventors
www.greatblackheroes.com/ 
www.historytoday.com/paul-edwards/history-black-people-britain 
www.blackpresence.co.uk/

www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/empire_seapower/black_britons_01.shtml 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/sep/15/hidden-histories-the-first-black-people-photographed-in-britain-in-pictures
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/08/the-first-legal-slave-owner-in-what-would-become-the-united-states-was-a-black-man/

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/blackhistory/early_times/settlers.htm
http://www.blackpast.org/gah/bibliography_authed
http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/about.html
http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmtimeline.html
http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/slavery
http://ghanaculturepolitics.com/directory/?cn-s=&cn-cat=34
http://blackinventor.com/
http://www.theroot.com/photos/2012/01/most_popular_black_military_heroes_black_history.html

Black Georgian - Shock of the Familiar, Black Cultural Archives

http://bcaheritage.org.uk/programme/exhibitions/black-georgians-the-shock-of-the-familiar/

No Colour Bar - Black Arts in Action 1960 - 1990, Friends of the Huntley Archive at London Metropolitan Archive (FHALMA)

https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/visit-the-city/attractions/guildhall-galleries/Pages/Exhibitions.aspx

African Threads Hackney Style, Hackney Museum

http://www.hackney.gov.uk/Assets/Documents/Black-history-month-programme.pdf

West Africa - Word, Symbol, Song, British Library

http://www.bl.uk/events/west-africa-word-symbol-song



 







The Seven Black Presidents Before Barack Obama
December 1, 2008 

Were There Black US Presidents before? The people thought that Barack Obama is the first black President of the United States. Wrong.

1. John Hanson (a Moor) was actually the 1st President of the United States, he served from 1781 – 1782 and he was black. The new country was actually formed on March 1, 1781 with the adoption of The Articles of Confederation. This document was actually proposed on June 11, 1776, but not agreed upon by Congress until November 15, 1777. Maryland refused to sign this document until Virginia and New York ceded their western lands (Maryland was afraid that these states would gain too much power in the new government from such large amounts of land).

Once the signing took place in 1781, a President was needed to run the country. John Hanson was chosen unanimously by Congress (which included George Washington). In fact, all the other potential candidates refused to run against him, as he was a major player in the revolution and an extremely influential member of Congress.

As President, Hanson ordered all foreign troops off American soil, as well as removal of all foreign flags. He established the Great Seal of the United States, which all Presidents since have been required to use on all Official Documents. He declared that the 4th Thursday of every November to be Thanksgiving Day, which is still true today. Even though elected, one variable that was never thought through was that America was not going to accept a Black President during the heart of the enslavement period. Enter George Washington.

2. Thomas Jefferson was the 3rd President of the United States, he served from 1801 – 1809 and he was black. His mother a half-breed Indian squaw and his father a mulatto (half white and half black) from Virginia. He fathered numerous children with Sally Hemmings, a mulatto slave with whom he lived with in Europe.

3. Andrew Jackson was the 7th President of the United States. He served from 1829 – 1837 and he was black. His mother was a white woman from Ireland who had Andrew Jackson with a black man. His father’s other children (Andrew Jackson’s stepbrother) was sold into slavery.

4. Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States, he served from 1861 – 1865 and he was black. His mother was from an Ethiopian Tribe and his father was an African American. It was told that his father was Thomas Lincoln, a man to cover the truth, but he was sterile from childhood mumps and was later castrated, making it impossible for him to have been his father. Lincoln’s nickname “Abraham Africa-nus the First.”

5. Warren Harding was the 28th President of the United States, he served from 1921 – 1923 and he was black. Harding never denied his ancestry. When Republican leaders called on Harding to deny his “Negro” history, he said, “How should I know whether or not one of my ancestors might have jumped the fence?”

6. Calvin Coolidge was the 29th President of the United States, he served from 1923 – 1929 and he was black. He proudly admitted that his mother was dark but claimed it was because of a mixed Indian ancestry. His mother’s maiden name was “Moor.” In Europe the name “Moor” was given to all Black people just as in America the name “Negro” was used.

7. Dwight E. Eisenhower was the 33rd President of the United States, he served from 1953 – 1961 and he was black. His mother, Ida Elizabeth Stover Eisenhower, an anti-war advocate, was half black.

So, America has survived and thrived through our first Seven Black Presidents and we will survive and THRIVE through the election of this one!
The first legal slave owner in the British colonies that would eventually become the United States was a black man.The man was Anthony Johnson.  Johnson first came over to America as an indentured servant, arriving in 1620 in the Colony of Virginia.

Who’s the woman on Canada’s new $10 bill? A Viola Desmond primer

In 1946, Viola Desmond’s stand at a segregated Nova Scotia movie theatre made her into a civil-rights icon for black Canadians. On Thursday, the federal government announced that she’ll be the new face on the Canadian $10 bill in 2018. Here’s what you need to know about her


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/women-on-banknotes-viola-desmond/article33264617/